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Victor Chukwueke – The Resilience of a Nigerian Student and America’s Acts of Kindness | Chocolate City: The Best African American Blog
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Victor Chukwueke – The Resilience of a Nigerian Student and America’s Acts of Kindness

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by Charles Mombo

Victor Chukwueke before and after his operations.
Victor Chukwueke before and after his operations.

Lately, we Americans have been bombarded with a constant influx of not-too-good news from the media.

Neither the Newtown massacre nor the partisan politicians heading for the cliff are any help. The news of that knucklehead, LaCraPierre, who talked crap on behalf of the organization which claims to be the foremost defender of my Second Amendment rights, did not help either.

Victor Chukwueke graduated from Wayne State University, where he delivered the commencement speech while receiving his bachelor's degree in biochemistry with a 3.82 GPA.
Victor Chukwueke graduated from Wayne State University, where he delivered the commencement speech while receiving his bachelor’s degree in biochemistry with a 3.82 GPA.

From time-to-time, a story of hope, resilience, “never say-never determination” does prove that despite all the negatives, kindness is still alive and well in America.

Victor Chukwueke, a 26-year-old Nigerian arrived in the U.S at the age of 15 with the hopes of removing large tumors from his face. Despite numerous surgeries, losing one eye and facing the emotional consequences of life-threatening trauma, Chukwueke had the audacity of wanting to be a medical doctor.

To make a long short, in the 11 years since Chukwueke had been in the U.S, he has earned his General Educational Development (GED), graduated from a junior college and graduated from Wayne State University, where he delivered the commencement speech while receiving his bachelor's degree in biochemistry with a 3.82 GPA. After graduation, he was accepted at the University of Toledo – College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

Despite the good news, Chukwueke had a problem – the university requires permanent residency status, which he does not have. In an act of kindness, the United States Congress passed a private bill last week granting Chukwueke permanent residency after years of him living in Michigan on an expired visa.

That bill requires President Barack Obama's signature before Chukwueke can pursue his dream of becoming a doctor.

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